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CHRNS MACS - The Multi Axis Crystal Spectrometer
NIST Center for Neutron Research

 

 

NOTE: This calendar is provided for assistance in scheduling experiments and sample environment. While every effort will be made to keep this schedule updated with the latest information, please visit the MACS SCHEDULE for official dates. DO NOT USE THIS INFORMATION FOR TRAVEL PLANS.

The Multi Axis Crystal Spectrometer at the NIST Center for Neutron Research is a third generation cold neutron spectrometer that provides ultra high sensitivity access to dynamic correlations in condensed matter on length scales from 0.1 nm to 50 nm and energy scales from 2.2 meV to 20 meV. The project is funded jointly by the NIST Center for Neutron Research, the National Science Foundation, and the Johns Hopkins University.

 

 

MACS highlights:

Neutron scattering experiments clarify mechanism of piezoelectricity in PMN.

Piezoelectrics—materials that can change mechanical stress to electricity and back again—are everywhere in modern life. Computer hard drives. Loud speakers. Medical ultrasound. Sonar. Though piezoelectrics are a widely used technology, there are major gaps in our understanding of how they work. Now researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Canada's Simon Fraser University believe they've learned why one of the main classes of these materials, known as relaxors, behaves in distinctly different ways from the rest and exhibit the largest piezoelectric effect. And the discovery comes in the shape of a butterfly. .  Details.

 

 

For Newly Discovered 'Quantum Spin Liquid', the Beauty Is in Its Simplicity.

A research team including scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has confirmed long-standing suspicions among physicists that electrons in a crystalline structure called a kagome (kah-go-may) lattice can form a "spin liquid," a novel quantum state of matter in which the electrons' magnetic orientation remains in a constant state of change.  Details.

 

 

NIST Contributes to Discovery of Novel Quantum Spin-Liquid

An international team of researchers including scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has found what may be the first known example of a "spin-orbital liquid," a substance in a never-before-seen quantum mechanical state.  Details.